Post D – Literature Review: OZ Harvest.

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‘Oz Harvest’, founded in 2004, collects excess food from various outlets that would otherwise become waste. Operating in Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Queensland and Melbourne (along with regional programs) – They have a far reaching network, eliminating the creation of organic waste Australia wide.

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The collected produce is distributed to over 900 charities, supporting those without basic access to regular fresh food. Oz Harvest have collected over 20,000 tonnes of food, transformed to 60 million meals that would have usually been dumped in landfill.

Several systems are in place, ranging from waste collection and redistribution to educational programs. ‘NEST’, by Oz Harvest, provides education surrounding nutrition and food intake. Targeting disadvantaged areas of the community, they are providing information to those who need it. Along with ‘NEST’, Oz Harvest has ‘Nourish’. Focused on the hospitality industry, the program targets youth working with food. They train their audience in proper food practices, focused on eliminating waste. Perhaps most interesting, OzHarvest Market (another initiative) engages the community as Australia’s rescued food supermarket.

“For every dollar invested in OzHarvest, (their) food rescue operations return $6.75 to the community through reduced food expenditure for charitable agencies”. Their organisation makes sense on an economic, social, and environmental level.

Analysing their annual report for operations during 2016, OZ Harvest boasts some impressive statistics. The impact of their origination is clear, the effectiveness of such a strategy will hopefully influence future waste management programs.

The information presented is easily accessible, well presented and clear. Particularly in the case of their annual reporting. They report no only outlines their achievement, it also displays general information on food waste in Australia. The organisation is both managing waste and educating communities on the extent of waste problems.

Although mostly operating on a local level, Oz Harvest have worked internationally. Across Asian Pacific, they have engaged one time events. Partnering with local chefs,  they served over 2,000 meals that would have otherwise been sent to landfill. This has sparked global interests. Moving forward, OZ Harvest aims to take their operations overseas.

In the context of food/organic waste management, I feel OZ Harvest are championing a sustainable, innovative model. The benefits extend beyond simply reducing landfill. Through educational programs and charitable services, OZ Harvest is working to shift society attitudes and values around waste. The ethical nature of their organisation is refreshing, with results looking positive. I feel programs o such as those mentioned above will help shape the future of waste management.

References

OzHarvest.org. 2004. OzHarvest. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ozharvest.org/. [Accessed 16 June 2017].

OzHarvest.org. 2016. The OzHarvest Effect 2016. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ozharvest.org/wpcontent/uploads/2014/04/OZHF0034F_OzHarvest_AnnualReport_Book2_FA3_LR41.pdf. [Accessed 17 June 2017].

Post C – Data Method Reflection

Data collection is an extremely important part of any design process. 

Reflecting on our research, I believe we overextended ourselves. This negatively affected our final presentation, as we struggled to communicate both our research and final proposal. Despite this, our research is highly relevant and the final outcome would not have been reached without it.

Stakeholder Analysis:

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Stakeholders surrounding our proposal were carefully mapped out alongside our boundaries. The information has been presented in order to highlight hierarchy.

Mind-mapping / Identifying Boundaries:

Working through our scheduled classes, we engaged in a variety of brainstorming exercises. the exercises resulted in a range of mind-maps exploring the various factors of waste management at UTS. As we collectively defined a focus for our project, the exercises helped to constrain our brief.

Literature Reviews:

In order to better support our education focused intervention, multiple literary reviews were conducted.

Empowering Education: critical teaching for social change – I. Shot (1992). This text was vital, justifying our emphasis on education. The text looks at the of role critical teaching. Ultimately, the text highlighted the responsibility of educational institutions to embed good social practices into eduction, guiding social change.   

Waste Education and Awareness Strategy: towards solid waste management (SWM) program at UKM – A. Desa (2012). A research paper surveying university students in the context of waste management. Surveying over 500 students, it was revealed that almost half had negative attitudes towards waste management. It proposed that education and awareness strategies are needed to shift attitudes.

STEEP Analysis:

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Surveys:

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Interviews:

Seb Crawford (Sustainability Coordinator, UTS Green) – Mr Crawford was interviewed in regards to the current food waste management strategies at UTS. We learn that ‘UTS Cleans Up’ (launched 2015) currently carries this weight. The strategy revolves around the segregation of waste (Building 10 Only), in preparation for future composting strategies on campus. It became clear that our proposal had merit, running our campaign parallel to present systems would increase awareness and help expand on current efforts.

Simone Sorters (Batyr UTS) – Ms Sorters uses on campus events to educate/support students in issues surrounding mental health. Due to Sorters input, we engaged in the ‘Impact Report 2016” This revealed the overwhelmingly positive results of Sorters’ efforts. Again, this contact spread confidence in our brief, it was important to see this campaign working across other issues.

Ultimately, our research extended beyond our initial goals, this led to great insight but disturbed the balance of our project.

References

Desa, A, 2012. Waste Education and Awareness Strategy: towards solid waste management (SWM) program at UKM. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, [Online]. 59, 47-50. Available at: http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1877042812036853/1-s2.0-S1877042812036853-main.pdf?_tid=aa536d8a-4aa4-11e7-b233-00000aacb360&acdnat=1496745855_bb98a80e33f295550c46a1e8ea5a5f12 [Accessed 31 May 2017].

Shor, I, 1992. Empowering Education: critical teaching for social change. 1st ed. Chicago 60637: The University of Chicago Press.

Post C

Aim:

A lack of understanding of the UTS waste system discourages the student body to participate and be educated in better practices surrounding waste segregation.

Enable the Fun Theory to educate the UTS student body to achieve better practices surrounding waste segregation, through an adaptable event stall that works within existing UTS events and expos, targeting the UTS student body with the aim of educating better practice of food waste segregation, through fun and adaptable games.

Objectives

Promote Waste Management Education through ‘For Purpose’ initiative and in an event store

  • That is able to flexibly integrate and work with existing UTS events/initiative/expos
  • That  educates UTS student body and faculty about food waste segregation and management through games, apps, booth activities

Stakeholders 

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 11.41.13 PM.pnginterview 1. Seb Crawford (uts green)

through Interviews with Seb Crawford we were able to explore and understand previous initiatives uts had taken to reduce its food waste, with a primary focus on education and awareness surrounding food waste management.  Seb informed us that “Most of the education happened during the rollout of the food waste stream under the branding of “UTS Cleans Up” in 2015. ‘UTS cleans up’ was an initiative that saw the introduction of a one bin system paired with a piloted food dehydrator. Communication surrounding ‘uts clean up’ came in the form of stickers attached to the bins explaining that all waste was appropriately segregated off sight.

Seb also informed us that “The food waste system at UTS is fairly new… they are still in the test phase we’ve done little comms and education around them so far”.  UTS has seen a great improvement in waste management over the past five years but there still seems to be a lack of understanding and engagement on a whole from the student body. We hypothesised that this lack of understanding Lead to the improper use of bins and greater contamination levels. As a group, we could see this from our own personal experiences but in order to prove our thoughts, a general student survey was conducted.

Surveys: UTS Student body

After analysing the information given to us by Seb it was still unclear how much of the ‘UTS cleans up’ communications were successful in educating the student body about UTS’ waste practices. Our student survey targeted a small group of (46 participants) over a range of disciplines and year groups targeting their understanding of the uts food waste stream and if they had come in contact with any educational material surrounding it. The results suggested 92% of students surveyed had a poor understanding of the food waste management process with a further 80% receiving a poor education surrounding food waste management at UTS.

After analyzing the data we concluded that a poor understanding of UTS’ food waste management practices led to an underlying negligence and confusion that could contribute to poor waste segregation and a lack of initiative from the student body. It also showed the complexities of communicating to a wide audience from differing backgrounds who all share differing ideas surrounding waste management.

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Interview #2: Simone Soeters (Batyr@UTS)

Batyr@UTS is a non for profit organisation that aims raises awareness for mental health issues within the UTS campus. Batyr has established an on-campus presence through student involvement and leadership, engaging the university community through quality programs and workshops. Batyr targets uts events with stalls and online programs that aims to educate and encourage the student body to engage in open conversations surrounding mental health issues. Through such events they’re able to reach out and create the personal connections necessary to help a wide audience. Their annual report ‘batyr impact report’  shows the sucess of their program, university students were the most engaged, with 88.4% reporting that they were either engaged or very engaged”(Batyr 2016 impact report). Batyr was a great example of a very successful organisation that engages and empowered the student body tackling stigma and issues surrounding mental health. Batyr achieves this through direct personal contact, utilising uts events and online programs.

literature reviews

  “Waste Education and Awareness Strategy” Procedia- Social and Behavioural Science

This text calls for higher level of education surrounding waste management with a particularly concerning for young students highlighting the importance of education in creating social or political change. The paper surveyed 591 university students with 40% having negative attitudes surrounding waste management “suggest(ing) that a carefully through-out waste education and awareness strategy should be developed in order to change students’ habits and behavior and traditions.”(Waste Education and Awareness Strategy (Procedia). Thus highlighting the importance of connecting with students enabling change through education and early intervention.

“Empowering education” Shor, I.

Empowering education critically analyses the responsibility of educational institutions to not just teach the course material but also embed good social practices. It highlights that through education students are empowered by good social practices and will help to change social trends in the future “Empowering education is oriented to self-transformation and social change”. (Shor 1992, p. 188).

Fun theory

The Fun Theory is a concept that strives to implement new ideas or resolve a change in values, by means of initiatives and activities that are considered ‘fun’ or ‘engaging’ to the audience.

Steep Analysis

Steep analysis looks at the impact of the project on a broader scale, analysing systems that it touches and is integrated into. These are (social, technological, environmental, economic and political).

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Boundary mapping:

Mapping the possible boundaries of the project allowed for an in-depth view and scope of the project.

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 11.41.23 PM Continue reading “Post C”

POST C

We the group, Level Three, proposed to a panel of organic food waste specialist on Wednesday 7th June 2017 to make organic food waste transparent at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) by looking at practices, education and promotion. We began our process by writing our own brief and deciding on the confines we wanted to stay within in the sense of our target market, geographic location, stakeholder and a point in the direction of what we wanted to design. This was all developed from a literature review, blackboard audit, survey, data collection and observations.

Brief

As a group you will have the opportunity to design and create a communication tool for students of The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and related demographics including staff and businesses in and around the UTS Campus. This communication tool needs to cater to practices, education and promotion by showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS.

Research needs to be undertaken to inform and raise awareness regarding the current food waste situation at UTS. Using the UTS Sustainable Development Goals as an initial starting point will assist beginning your process for showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS. Primary and secondary methods such as data collection, mind maps, surveys, observation, user testing and literature review need to be undertaken carefully with precision to provide accurate data.

Your presentation of your UTS food waste communication tool is due Wednesday 7th June 2017. You will need to have the food waste tool finalised by Friday 2nd June 2017.

You are to approach the food waste problem at UTS in four separate areas:

  • Food Waste Management
  • Food Waste Communication
  • Food Waste Education
  • Food Waste Systems

The communication tool needs to be presented neatly and in a cohesive manner. Remember you’re designing mainly for students but also for UTS staff and businesses around the UTS campus.

Above is our brief. Initially we struggled to place the right confines on our brief from attempting to come up with the final design solution before going through the design process. The brief hits a couple of key points we decided to align ourselves and the goals we wanted to achieve to the UTS Sustainable Develop Goals. Another key point was sharing and communicating to the UTS community, mainly students about the benefits of organic food waste and what can do to make it transparent.

Survey Analysis

We conducted a survey on organic food waste at UTS aimed at students to see what they knew about the system and whether they wanted to know more. The questions we asked on Survey Monkey, an Internet survey platform made it easier and faster to collect the data.

The results from the survey, identified students don’t know much about the organic food waste system at UTS referring to the 26 out of 39 people in question one. However 37 out of 39 people said they would change their behaviour referring to question four, if they were provided facts and figures. The other insight made was 27 out of 39 people were willing to be part of a broader scheme of organic food waste even with a chance their efforts could be wasted.

Literature Review

We’ve conducted a literature review to further ground our research regarding the current standings of food waste. Looking at this matter from a bigger picture, we’ve divided our research into three sub topics regarding our main focus on food waste (transparency); transparency in everyday practices, education, and promotion. Transparency in everyday practices focuses on the habits and behaviours of humans that shapes the current state of food waste our society is at now. We focused on diving in deeper on how big of an impact of humans can make regarding food waste, and how important it is to know beyond the existing rules of waste distribution, rather concrete their understandings on the current state of food waste. Transparency in education focuses on the precise definition of food waste by being transparent about food waste, as a lack of understanding can result to ignorance. Transparency in promotion is a big part of food waste – our take on this topic was to be completely transparent about the numbers and statistics of the state of food waste right now, as well as goals for the future. This way, we were hoping to stimulate interest from society to take part in improving this matter.

This literature review helped us develop a concrete definition of transparency and food waste itself to move forward with our design ideas. We understand that education was a key point of this topic – as a result, we chose to focus on integrating an educational advertisement through promoting the importance of transparency regarding food waste, and how big of an impact humans can contribute to make a change.

Designs

The first design we created was poster based. We believe posters are always a necessary element to any advertising campaign due to their ability to intrigue passerby’s, contain all relevant details and maintain a prominence across the campus. Containing a different type of food on each, the vector is depicted at a low transparency to reinforce our transparent theme.

The second design constructed was a design that we decided on when walking the sidewalks of the university. “Food Prints” were formed as a concept that can be applied to the ground of all walking spaces on campus. Naturally looking down when walking, students, staff and visitors can walk on our food prints and at a glance, be reminded of the message we are attempting to convey to to UTS as a whole.

Conclusion

Our transparency communication tool has been developed from the results of the literature review, black board audit, organic food waste data collection, online survey and visual analysis. This has given us the evidence to design an appropriate answer to organic food waste not going to landfill but back into our gardens by means of compost from the machines in building 8 and 10.

Bibliography

Post D

The three “R”s are used in waste managements commonly. They represent “Reduction, Reuse and Recovery”. As waste generation increases, processing costs increase, available landfill space. The three “R” has become the core objective of sustainable waste management (Dalhousie University, 2011).

The concept of waste reduction or waste minimization involves redesigning the product or changing Consumption, use and waste generated by the social model to prevent waste minimising the toxicity of waste produced. A common example of waste reduction. Including the use of reusable coffee cups instead of disposable coffee mugs, reduced product packaging, and buy durable products that can be repaired rather than replaced. The reduction can also be achieved by reducing the consumption of products, goods, and services. The most effective way the first thing to reduce waste is because no waste is created, so waste is the first place to reduce waste. In many cases, the product can be reduced by reusing the product. Action to take action before waste is actually produced and can also be called pre-cycle. Sometimes it may be used for the same purpose multiple times in the same form; this is known as “Reuse”. Many examples include using one-sided paper for notes and reusing disposable paper Shopping bags or using boxes as storage containers. Re-use of the product replaced Need to buy other products, so as to prevent waste. Minimise waste reducing and reusing provides several advantages, including the conservation of the use of natural resources (Dalhousie University, 2011). 

New products and waste generated in the manufacturing process to reduce the waste generated product processing and reduce costs associated with waste disposal. Not all of the discarded products can be removed, and even reusable products will need to be replaced eventually. Waste is unavoidable as a byproduct of human life, but in many ways, wasting may be transferred and recycled into valuable new materials. Glass, plastic Paper products are usually collected and the concept of waste reduction or waste minimization involves redesigning the product or changing consumption, use and waste generated by the social model to prevent waste minimising the toxicity of waste produced (SUEZ, 2017). A common example of waste reduction including the use of reusable coffee cups instead of disposable coffee mugs, reduced product packaging, and buy durable products that can be repaired rather than replaced. The reduction can also be achieved by reducing the consumption of products, goods, and services. In many cases, the most effective way is the first thing to reduce waste. No waste is created so wasting is the first place to reduce waste. In many cases, the product can be reduced by reusing the product. Action to take action before waste is actually produced and can also be called pre-cycle. Sometimes it may be used for the same purpose multiple times in the same form so this is known as reuse. Examples include using one-sided paper for notes and reusing disposable paper Shopping bags or using boxes as storage containers. Re-use of the product replaced Need to buy other products, so as to prevent waste. Minimise waste Reducing and reusing provides several advantages, including the conservation of the use of natural resources (Dalhousie University, 2011).

New products and waste generated in the manufacturing process; to reduce the waste generated product processing and reduce costs associated with waste disposal. Not all of the discarded products can be removed, and even reusable products will eventually need to be replaced. Wasting is unavoidable as a byproduct of human life, but in many ways, this waste may be transferred and recycled into valuable new materials. Glass, plastic paper products are usually collected and sometimes it may be used for the same purpose multiple times in the same form so this is known as “Reuse”. Many examples include using one-sided paper for notes and reusing disposable paper Shopping bags or using boxes as storage containers. Re-use of the product replaced the need to buy other products, so as to prevent waste. Minimise waste reducing and reusing provides several advantages, including the conservation of the use of natural resources. New products and waste generated in the manufacturing process to reduce the waste generated product processing and reduce costs associated with waste disposal. Not all of the discarded products can be removed, and even reusable products will eventually need to be replaced. Waste is unavoidable as a byproduct of human life (Kim, 2002), but in many ways, this waste may be transferred and recycled into valuable new materials. Glass, plastic paper products are usually collected and remodelled into new materials and products. Recycling the product offers many benefits of reducing waste (replacing the use of new materials, reducing waste generation and disposal-related costs), but recovery requires energy and inputs some new material, which reduces it to the waist level rather than reducing and reusing (Dalhousie University, 2011).

Many waste management frameworks attempt to incorporate this capability into three “R”. In England, North America, the whole of Europe and parts of Asia, are being incorporated into the waste hierarchy promote the adoption and use of “reduction, reuse, and recycling” initiatives. Waste management level puts the highest priority of waste prevention and reuses in the first place Waste recycling.

We went to investigate Lucas Heights Resource Recovery Park.tupian2

(From homepage)

The SUEZ Organic Resource Recycling Facility is an open-air composting system that accepts only organic substances separated from sources, such as gardening organic, liquid grease traps and some commercial organic materials, including wood and sawdust. These materials are processed into high-quality compost products for home gardens, as well as public open spaces such as stadiums and park garden beds, improving the social facilities of the local community. Other high-quality compost products are used to improve soil fertility and reduce environmental hazards in the use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides in vegetable, fruit and wine production (SUEZ, 2017).

SUEZ currently has 8 organic resource recovery facilities. SUEZ’s organic resource recovery facility does not accept residential (or roadside) food waste, however, our advanced resource recovery technology (ARRT) facility welcomes this ingredient through the Council and commercial and industrial contracts (SUEZ, 2017).

 

References: 

SUEZ, 2017. Environmental Management, accessed 18 June 2017, <http://www.sita.com.au/sustainability/environmental-management/&gt;

SUEZ, 2017. Organic Resource Recovery Facilities, accessed 18 June 2017, <http://www.sita.com.au/facilities/organic-resource-recovery-facilities/&gt;

Dalhousie University, 2011. Waste Management Practices: Literature Review, accessed 18 June 2017, <https://www.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/dept/sustainability/Waste%20Management%20Literature%20Review%20Final%20June%202011%20%281.49%20MB%29.pdf&gt;

POST C

We the group, Level Three, proposed to a panel of organic food waste specialist on Wednesday 7th June 2017 to make organic food waste transparent at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) by looking at practices, education and promotion. We began our process by writing our own brief and deciding on the confines we wanted to stay within in the sense of our target market, geographic location, stakeholder and a point in the direction of what we wanted to design. This was all developed from a literature review, blackboard audit, survey, data collection and observations.

Brief

As a group you will have the opportunity to design and create a communication tool for students of The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and related demographics including staff and businesses in and around the UTS Campus. This communication tool needs to cater to practices, education and promotion by showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS.

Research needs to be undertaken to inform and raise awareness regarding the current food waste situation at UTS. Using the UTS Sustainable Development Goals as an initial starting point will assist beginning your process for showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS. Primary and secondary methods such as data collection, mind maps, surveys, observation, user testing and literature review need to be undertaken carefully with precision to provide accurate data.

Your presentation of your UTS food waste communication tool is due Wednesday 7th June 2017. You will need to have the food waste tool finalised by Friday 2nd June 2017.

You are to approach the food waste problem at UTS in four separate areas:

  • Food Waste Management
  • Food Waste Communication
  • Food Waste Education
  • Food Waste Systems

The communication tool needs to be presented neatly and in a cohesive manner. Remember you’re designing mainly for students but also for UTS staff and businesses around the UTS campus.

Above is our brief. Initially we struggled to place the right confines on our brief from attempting to come up with the final design solution before going through the design process. The brief hits a couple of key points we decided to align ourselves and the goals we wanted to achieve to the UTS Sustainable Develop Goals. Another key point was sharing and communicating to the UTS community, mainly students about the benefits of organic food waste and what can do to make it transparent.

Survey Analysis

We conducted a survey on organic food waste at UTS aimed at students to see what they knew about the system and whether they wanted to know more. The questions we asked on Survey Monkey, an Internet survey platform made it easier and faster to collect the data.

The results from the survey, identified students don’t know much about the organic food waste system at UTS referring to the 26 out of 39 people in question one. However 37 out of 39 people said they would change their behaviour referring to question four, if they were provided facts and figures. The other insight made was 27 out of 39 people were willing to be part of a broader scheme of organic food waste even with a chance their efforts could be wasted.

Literature Review

We’ve conducted a literature review to further ground our research regarding the current standings of food waste. Looking at this matter from a bigger picture, we’ve divided our research into three sub topics regarding our main focus on food waste (transparency); transparency in everyday practices, education, and promotion. Transparency in everyday practices focuses on the habits and behaviours of humans that shapes the current state of food waste our society is at now. We focused on diving in deeper on how big of an impact of humans can make regarding food waste, and how important it is to know beyond the existing rules of waste distribution, rather concrete their understandings on the current state of food waste. Transparency in education focuses on the precise definition of food waste by being transparent about food waste, as a lack of understanding can result to ignorance. Transparency in promotion is a big part of food waste – our take on this topic was to be completely transparent about the numbers and statistics of the state of food waste right now, as well as goals for the future. This way, we were hoping to stimulate interest from society to take part in improving this matter.

This literature review helped us develop a concrete definition of transparency and food waste itself to move forward with our design ideas. We understand that education was a key point of this topic – as a result, we chose to focus on integrating an educational advertisement through promoting the importance of transparency regarding food waste, and how big of an impact humans can contribute to make a change.

Designs

The first design we created was poster based. We believe posters are always a necessary element to any advertising campaign due to their ability to intrigue passerby’s, contain all relevant details and maintain a prominence across the campus. Containing a different type of food on each, the vector is depicted at a low transparency to reinforce our transparent theme.

The second design constructed was a design that we decided on when walking the sidewalks of the university. “Food Prints” were formed as a concept that can be applied to the ground of all walking spaces on campus. Naturally looking down when walking, students, staff and visitors can walk on our food prints and at a glance, be reminded of the message we are attempting to convey to UTS as a whole.

Conclusion

Our transparency communication tool has been developed from the results of the literature review, black board audit, organic food waste data collection, online survey and visual analysis. This has given us the evidence to design an appropriate answer to organic food waste not going to landfill but back into our gardens by means of compost from the machines in building 8 and 10.

Bibliography

Post C: Project

We the group, Level Three, proposed to a panel of organic food waste specialist on Wednesday 7th June 2017 to make organic food waste transparent at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) by looking at practices, education and promotion. We began our process by writing our own brief and deciding on the confines we wanted to stay within in the sense of our target market, geographic location, stakeholder and a point in the direction of what we wanted to design. This was all developed from a literature review, blackboard audit, survey, data collection and observations.

Brief

As a group you will have the opportunity to design and create a communication tool for students of The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and related demographics including staff and businesses in and around the UTS Campus. This communication tool needs to cater to practices, education and promotion by showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS.

Research needs to be undertaken to inform and raise awareness regarding the current food waste situation at UTS. Using the UTS Sustainable Development Goals as an initial starting point will assist beginning your process for showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS. Primary and secondary methods such as data collection, mind maps, surveys, observation, user testing and literature review need to be undertaken carefully with precision to provide accurate data.

Your presentation of your UTS food waste communication tool is due Wednesday 7th June 2017. You will need to have the food waste tool finalised by Friday 2nd June 2017.

You are to approach the food waste problem at UTS in four separate areas:

  • Food Waste Management
  • Food Waste Communication
  • Food Waste Education
  • Food Waste Systems

The communication tool needs to be presented neatly and in a cohesive manner. Remember you’re designing mainly for students but also for UTS staff and businesses around the UTS campus.

Above is our brief. Initially we struggled to place the right confines on our brief from attempting to come up with the final design solution before going through the design process. The brief hits a couple of key points we decided to align ourselves and the goals we wanted to achieve to the UTS Sustainable Develop Goals. Another key point was sharing and communicating to the UTS community, mainly students about the benefits of organic food waste and what can do to make it transparent.

Survey Analysis

We conducted a survey on organic food waste at UTS aimed at students to see what they knew about the system and whether they wanted to know more. The questions we asked on Survey Monkey, an Internet survey platform made it easier and faster to collect the data.

The results from the survey, identified students don’t know much about the organic food waste system at UTS referring to the 26 out of 39 people in question one. However 37 out of 39 people said they would change their behaviour referring to question four, if they were provided facts and figures. The other insight made was 27 out of 39 people were willing to be part of a broader scheme of organic food waste even with a chance their efforts could be wasted.

Literature Review

We’ve conducted a literature review to further ground our research regarding the current standings of food waste. Looking at this matter from a bigger picture, we’ve divided our research into three sub topics regarding our main focus on food waste (transparency); transparency in everyday practices, education, and promotion. Transparency in everyday practices focuses on the habits and behaviours of humans that shapes the current state of food waste our society is at now. We focused on diving in deeper on how big of an impact of humans can make regarding food waste, and how important it is to know beyond the existing rules of waste distribution, rather concrete their understandings on the current state of food waste. Transparency in education focuses on the precise definition of food waste by being transparent about food waste, as a lack of understanding can result to ignorance. Transparency in promotion is a big part of food waste – our take on this topic was to be completely transparent about the numbers and statistics of the state of food waste right now, as well as goals for the future. This way, we were hoping to stimulate interest from society to take part in improving this matter.

This literature review helped us develop a concrete definition of transparency and food waste itself to move forward with our design ideas. We understand that education was a key point of this topic – as a result, we chose to focus on integrating an educational advertisement through promoting the importance of transparency regarding food waste, and how big of an impact humans can contribute to make a change.

Designs

The first design we created was poster based. We believe posters are always a necessary element to any advertising campaign due to their ability to intrigue passerby’s, contain all relevant details and maintain a prominence across the campus. Containing a different type of food on each, the vector is depicted at a low transparency to reinforce our transparent theme.

The second design constructed was a design that we decided on when walking the sidewalks of the university. “Food Prints” were formed as a concept that can be applied to the ground of all walking spaces on campus. Naturally looking down when walking, students, staff and visitors can walk on our food prints and at a glance, be reminded of the message we are attempting to convey to to UTS as a whole.

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Conclusion

Our transparency communication tool has been developed from the results of the literature review, black board audit, organic food waste data collection, online survey and visual analysis. This has given us the evidence to design an appropriate answer to organic food waste not going to landfill but back into our gardens by means of compost from the machines in building 8 and 10.

Bibliography