Post C: Project

We the group, Level Three, proposed to a panel of organic food waste specialist on Wednesday 7th June 2017 to make organic food waste transparent at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) by looking at practices, education and promotion. We began our process by writing our own brief and deciding on the confines we wanted to stay within in the sense of our target market, geographic location, stakeholder and a point in the direction of what we wanted to design. This was all developed from a literature review, blackboard audit, survey, data collection and observations.

Brief

As a group you will have the opportunity to design and create a communication tool for students of The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and related demographics including staff and businesses in and around the UTS Campus. This communication tool needs to cater to practices, education and promotion by showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS.

Research needs to be undertaken to inform and raise awareness regarding the current food waste situation at UTS. Using the UTS Sustainable Development Goals as an initial starting point will assist beginning your process for showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS. Primary and secondary methods such as data collection, mind maps, surveys, observation, user testing and literature review need to be undertaken carefully with precision to provide accurate data.

Your presentation of your UTS food waste communication tool is due Wednesday 7th June 2017. You will need to have the food waste tool finalised by Friday 2nd June 2017.

You are to approach the food waste problem at UTS in four separate areas:

  • Food Waste Management
  • Food Waste Communication
  • Food Waste Education
  • Food Waste Systems

The communication tool needs to be presented neatly and in a cohesive manner. Remember you’re designing mainly for students but also for UTS staff and businesses around the UTS campus.

Above is our brief. Initially we struggled to place the right confines on our brief from attempting to come up with the final design solution before going through the design process. The brief hits a couple of key points we decided to align ourselves and the goals we wanted to achieve to the UTS Sustainable Develop Goals. Another key point was sharing and communicating to the UTS community, mainly students about the benefits of organic food waste and what can do to make it transparent.

Survey Analysis

We conducted a survey on organic food waste at UTS aimed at students to see what they knew about the system and whether they wanted to know more. The questions we asked on Survey Monkey, an Internet survey platform made it easier and faster to collect the data.

The results from the survey, identified students don’t know much about the organic food waste system at UTS referring to the 26 out of 39 people in question one. However 37 out of 39 people said they would change their behaviour referring to question four, if they were provided facts and figures. The other insight made was 27 out of 39 people were willing to be part of a broader scheme of organic food waste even with a chance their efforts could be wasted.

Literature Review

We’ve conducted a literature review to further ground our research regarding the current standings of food waste. Looking at this matter from a bigger picture, we’ve divided our research into three sub topics regarding our main focus on food waste (transparency); transparency in everyday practices, education, and promotion. Transparency in everyday practices focuses on the habits and behaviours of humans that shapes the current state of food waste our society is at now. We focused on diving in deeper on how big of an impact of humans can make regarding food waste, and how important it is to know beyond the existing rules of waste distribution, rather concrete their understandings on the current state of food waste. Transparency in education focuses on the precise definition of food waste by being transparent about food waste, as a lack of understanding can result to ignorance. Transparency in promotion is a big part of food waste – our take on this topic was to be completely transparent about the numbers and statistics of the state of food waste right now, as well as goals for the future. This way, we were hoping to stimulate interest from society to take part in improving this matter.

This literature review helped us develop a concrete definition of transparency and food waste itself to move forward with our design ideas. We understand that education was a key point of this topic – as a result, we chose to focus on integrating an educational advertisement through promoting the importance of transparency regarding food waste, and how big of an impact humans can contribute to make a change.

Designs

The first design we created was poster based. We believe posters are always a necessary element to any advertising campaign due to their ability to intrigue passerby’s, contain all relevant details and maintain a prominence across the campus. Containing a different type of food on each, the vector is depicted at a low transparency to reinforce our transparent theme.

The second design constructed was a design that we decided on when walking the sidewalks of the university. “Food Prints” were formed as a concept that can be applied to the ground of all walking spaces on campus. Naturally looking down when walking, students, staff and visitors can walk on our food prints and at a glance, be reminded of the message we are attempting to convey to to UTS as a whole.

20170619_00525120170619_00522120170619_005139

Conclusion

Our transparency communication tool has been developed from the results of the literature review, black board audit, organic food waste data collection, online survey and visual analysis. This has given us the evidence to design an appropriate answer to organic food waste not going to landfill but back into our gardens by means of compost from the machines in building 8 and 10.

Bibliography

POST C

We the group, Level Three, proposed to a panel of organic food waste specialist on Wednesday 7th June 2017 to make organic food waste transparent at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) by looking at practices, education and promotion. We began our process by writing our own brief and deciding on the confines we wanted to stay within in the sense of our target market, geographic location, stakeholder and a point in the direction of what we wanted to design. This was all developed from a literature review, blackboard audit, survey, data collection and observations.

Brief

As a group you will have the opportunity to design and create a communication tool for students of The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and related demographics including staff and businesses in and around the UTS Campus. This communication tool needs to cater to practices, education and promotion by showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS.

Research needs to be undertaken to inform and raise awareness regarding the current food waste situation at UTS. Using the UTS Sustainable Development Goals as an initial starting point will assist beginning your process for showing transparency surrounding the issues of food waste at UTS. Primary and secondary methods such as data collection, mind maps, surveys, observation, user testing and literature review need to be undertaken carefully with precision to provide accurate data.

Your presentation of your UTS food waste communication tool is due Wednesday 7th June 2017. You will need to have the food waste tool finalised by Friday 2nd June 2017.

You are to approach the food waste problem at UTS in four separate areas:

  • Food Waste Management
  • Food Waste Communication
  • Food Waste Education
  • Food Waste Systems

The communication tool needs to be presented neatly and in a cohesive manner. Remember you’re designing mainly for students but also for UTS staff and businesses around the UTS campus.

Above is our brief. Initially we struggled to place the right confines on our brief from attempting to come up with the final design solution before going through the design process. The brief hits a couple of key points we decided to align ourselves and the goals we wanted to achieve to the UTS Sustainable Develop Goals. Another key point was sharing and communicating to the UTS community, mainly students about the benefits of organic food waste and what can do to make it transparent.

Survey Analysis

We conducted a survey on organic food waste at UTS aimed at students to see what they knew about the system and whether they wanted to know more. The questions we asked on Survey Monkey, an Internet survey platform made it easier and faster to collect the data.

The results from the survey, identified students don’t know much about the organic food waste system at UTS referring to the 26 out of 39 people in question one. However 37 out of 39 people said they would change their behaviour referring to question four, if they were provided facts and figures. The other insight made was 27 out of 39 people were willing to be part of a broader scheme of organic food waste even with a chance their efforts could be wasted.

Literature Review

We’ve conducted a literature review to further ground our research regarding the current standings of food waste. Looking at this matter from a bigger picture, we’ve divided our research into three sub topics regarding our main focus on food waste (transparency); transparency in everyday practices, education, and promotion. Transparency in everyday practices focuses on the habits and behaviours of humans that shapes the current state of food waste our society is at now. We focused on diving in deeper on how big of an impact of humans can make regarding food waste, and how important it is to know beyond the existing rules of waste distribution, rather concrete their understandings on the current state of food waste. Transparency in education focuses on the precise definition of food waste by being transparent about food waste, as a lack of understanding can result to ignorance. Transparency in promotion is a big part of food waste – our take on this topic was to be completely transparent about the numbers and statistics of the state of food waste right now, as well as goals for the future. This way, we were hoping to stimulate interest from society to take part in improving this matter.

This literature review helped us develop a concrete definition of transparency and food waste itself to move forward with our design ideas. We understand that education was a key point of this topic – as a result, we chose to focus on integrating an educational advertisement through promoting the importance of transparency regarding food waste, and how big of an impact humans can contribute to make a change.

Designs

The first design we created was poster based. We believe posters are always a necessary element to any advertising campaign due to their ability to intrigue passerby’s, contain all relevant details and maintain a prominence across the campus. Containing a different type of food on each, the vector is depicted at a low transparency to reinforce our transparent theme.

The second design constructed was a design that we decided on when walking the sidewalks of the university. “Food Prints” were formed as a concept that can be applied to the ground of all walking spaces on campus. Naturally looking down when walking, students, staff and visitors can walk on our food prints and at a glance, be reminded of the message we are attempting to convey to to UTS as a whole.

20170619_00525120170619_00522120170619_005139

Conclusion

Our transparency communication tool has been developed from the results of the literature review, black board audit, organic food waste data collection, online survey and visual analysis. This has given us the evidence to design an appropriate answer to organic food waste not going to landfill but back into our gardens by means of compost from the machines in building 8 and 10.

Bibliography

Post D: Research of existing Organic Waste Management Systems

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According to the data from an Australian community called Foodwise, 20% of food will be discarded. 1036 dollars of food is wasted for the average Australian household, more than 8 billion dollars of food is wasted every year in Australia. This local organization has an educational website to explain some facts about organic waste existing in Australia. This website was

recycling_bin

founded during the audit assignment which is helpful for my whole subject. Foodwise has devoted to improve Australian people’s awareness of food to reduce organic. Foodwise is not only providing data information, but also educating people about recipes, meal plans, a self growth food campaign to stimulate people farm their own food. Another similar company called Closed Loop also provides waste management services to companies, reducing the waste, to reduce the cost. Organic waste is also what they looking at. Designing organic food packages ,managing resources and the classified bin to help companies such as KFC to reach their sustainable goal.

 

 

 

 

 

Food waste(eatable parts) is avoidable if people have the awareness. Foods are becoming cheaper so that shopping without thinking will appear more frequently. By doing the interview to students living in UTS housing, almost all the interviewees don’t really care about waste of food. Think about it: if even educated Uni students don’t care, who cares? In my opinion, most people have never received food related education, so the issue is reasonable. Food related education is significant, and it need to be appearing in people’s views frequently to improve public awareness.

Some organic wastes are unavoidable such as peels, bones, etc. the existing organic waste management deals with these waste in 2 ways, recycle and landfill. Landfill is the most common method to deal with organic waste because of the immature and high-cost of the recycling technology, and also, organic waste from households and other places are not classified, they always mixed with other un-recyclable general waste. Waste management company SUEZ located at Lucas heights deals with all kinds of waste. 微信图片_20170618212929SUEZ landfill hole

We have visited the landfill place during a class. They deal with organic waste as general waste which let them go to landfill. The huge landfill hole can contain general waste for years in the future. Organic waste doesn’t pollute the environment, so landfill can be the most efficient and cheap solution. But SUEZ also have a web page talking about dealing with organic waste in a particular way. SUEZ Organic Resource Recovery Facilities recycle the wastes to compost products such as sporting fields and garden beds for families and public places. But this facilities have limited to recycle several specific waste. The limitation has hindered its popularization. Closed Loop company has also helped UTS created the facilities to separate recycle organic waste to produce fertilizers. It requires all the waste resources are pure food/organic waste, and the product of this project can be used in soil and make a profit. In conclusion, recycling organic waste is the better way for sustainability, but it is still a experimental solution at this stage. Landfill is still playing a dominant role for dealing with organic waste.Untitled-1

 

References

Fast Facts on Food Waste, FOODWISE, viewed 16 June 2017, < http://www.foodwise.com.au/foodwaste/food-waste-fast-facts/&gt;.

Organic waste management, SUEZ, viewed 16 June 2017, < http://www.sita.com.au/commercial-solutions/resource-recovery-recycling/organic-material/&gt;

Products and services, CLOSED LOOP, viewed 16 June 2017, < http://www.closedloop.com.au/products-and-services&gt;.

Bin-go. The design and research process.

Our brief

As a group and with the guidance of our tutors, we constructed our own brief that would seek to identify a problem within UTS’s waste management and offer a solution. A problem we identified throughout our classes and research was that students, especially international, were not knowledgeable in practices surrounding waste segregation in NSW. Our Aim then was to educate UTS students in better waste management practices.

During our project we used ;Mind Maps, boundary mapping, stakeholder mapping, interviews, surveys, literature reviews, STEEP analysis, review of existing products and waste audits.

Brainstorming

Mind maps

Mind maps were used at almost every stage of our projects. The creativity and productivity blog ‘Focus’ outlines many of the benefits of mind mapping, such as they present information clearly, they are visually driven and they enable a free flow of ideas (Richard 2015)

Personally it is a tool I use very often instead of listing dot points as I find it faster and easier to add new ideas later. To begin we used mind maps to explore our boundaries and the stakeholders. Later in the project mind maps were used to brainstorm solutions to our derived problems.

Boundary and stakeholder Mapping

We started mapping the boundaries and stakeholder by using a mind map to explore the categories and the contents of those categories that would be relevant to our brief. Our goal was to identify who was relevant and important for us to consider when conducting research and designing. We needed to identify boundaries so we would stick to what is relevant to our stakeholders. By doing this it would also help us to constrict our research and design to what we have time to conduct.

Boundary Map

Boundary Mapping of Project

 

Stakeholder map

Stakeholders

 

Conducting Research

Literature reviews

To see what practices and insights already exist we searched academic databases to find the relevant and applicable literature.

Waste Education and Awareness Strategy: Towards Solid Waste Management (SWM) Program at UKM

The paper is about the introduction of waste minimisation practices at UKM (what is it). It aimed to assess waste management amongst first year students. The paper assessed a very similar demographic to ours as it focused on first year students. The paper showed that most student, around 60%, had a positive attitude towards the implemented program. It notes that that there is still a need for the university to encourage awareness through education.

Empowering education

The book by Ira Shor is about Shor’s 20 years of experimentation into learning methods. Shor mentions the importance of international education (through university) and external education (at home) to create social reform. It states that the education institution has the responsibility to embed good social practices into education to change social trends into the future.

STEEP analysis

The university of Pittsburgh defines a STEEP analysis as :

A tool for structuring thinking and key categories to make sure you do not overlook any is the well-known STEEP analysis. The STEEP analysis is a logical and effective way to begin.” (University of Pittsburgh 2017)

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Our STEEP analysis was:

Social

Multi-cultural environment, wide ranging food waste practices.
Varied levels of engagement in food waste practices.
University practice and student engagement and awareness not aligned.

Technological

UTS largely invested in waste management strategies utilising new technology.
Developing solutions for organic food and general waste will become increasingly important

Environmental

Waste generated on campus from various sources.
Access to a consistent waste disposal practice is not defined. Various systems used as home and at university.

Economic

Potential engagement with Sydney council, kickbacks/ returns for proper waste management.

Political

Bureaucratic nature of organisation complicates the implementation process.
Constancy will require changes to existing systems.
Lack of student representation surround food was management.

Our Design

From the research we had conducted before commencing our design we believed an effective solution with benefit from the use of ‘Fun Theory’. Similar to gamification  “the process of making activities more game-like” as defined by academic Kevin Werbach (Werbach 2014). Fun Theory aims to teach social practices by making the learning process fun.

Existing products

We investigated existing products that have used fun theory to teach or persuade people about healthy lifestyles and disposing of waste. Fun Theory has been pioneered by Volkswagen.  The website http://www.thefuntheory.com/ created by VW displays many examples of the theory in practice.

The following youtube video using bins is quite relevant to our design. https://youtu.be/cbEKAwCoCKw

Waste audit

Before we delved into learning about waste management a couple of weeks ago we had created a waste audit. To learn how own waste management practices had changed we conducted a new audit following our education and research.

I saw a slight improvement of my waste management such as improved accuracy of waste types. We learnt the importance and benefits of composting but not how to compost or what kind of compost is appropriate for apartments. So although my waste audit has not yet improved dramatically I believe it will continue to improve as I have the ambition to start composting.

Conclusion

We believe that there is a lack of focus of education towards waste management and that lead to problems with students’ attitude towards waste management at UTS. Our research indicated that a gap needs to be bridged between UTS’s sustainability goals and student attitudes to encourage more engagement in UTS students in correct waste management. By doing this we believe students will be more concerned with how they dispose of waste at university and home.

I am proud and impressed with UTS’s sustainability goals but I believe that UTS has the power to expand its impact by better teaching its students proper waste management. By doing this students will take home those good practices and sustain them in life after university. The problem that I see is that university will not be credited for practices performed outside of university and therefore would not be interested.

Reference list

Richard 2015, Mind Mapping Benefits – Who Needs Mind Maps?, Mind Meister, Viewed 18 June 2017,<https://www.mindmeister.com/blog/mind-mapping-benefits-who-needs-mind-maps/#comments >

University of Pittsburgh 2017, Marketing, Planning and Strategy – Oakland Campus: S.T.E.E.P., Viewed 18 June 2017, <http://pitt.libguides.com/scenarioplanning/steep >

Volkswagen 2009, The Fun Theory, VW, Viewed 18 June 2017,<http://www.thefuntheory.com/ >

Werbach K 2014, (Re)Defining Gamification: A Process Approach, Persuasive Technology, vol 8462, pp 266-272

C. Research Methods

Research is a highly instrumental component of any task which should be completed consistently across its’ development. The understanding that “the purpose of research is to inform actions” (Unite for Sight 2015) can be observed within a multitude of circumstances. Spanning from simplistic behavioural properties, humankind has long been using primal research methods in order to develop themselves as a specie. This concept has been implemented within the realm of education whereby students re-contexualise their findings and thus, expand the implications of original data.

Research as a process must be iterative and cyclical (Unite for Sight 2015) in order for it to in turn be transformative and thorough. Varying research methods allow this to occur and ultimately dictate the perspective from which certain topics are ascertained.

Upon beginning the design brief, our group generated a list of methods from which we would draw upon as a means of gathering primary and secondary information to inform our proceeding actions. Though successful research can be considered somewhat serendipitous, (The University of Western Australia 2012) the pragmatic stigma that constitutes the highest quality of information can be accounted for by the methods chosen in relation to the desired outcome.      

Observation is a systematic data collection approach (Cohen D, Crabtree B 2006) which takes place on site and is subjective to the participants’ sensory experiences. This method initiated the data collection process for our design brief as it allowed us to obtain contextual data which would ultimately form the basis of our outcome. Observation allowed us to accurately locate the issue at hand within the constraints of UTS Housing and enabled us to locate physical points of intervention for our outcome.

Literature reviews inherently consider the stance of others on a particular topic, from which, readers would deduct their own perspectives and apply this newfound knowledge to their individual projects. This method therefore effectively informed us about organic waste and the psycho-analytic use of technology as we were able to use statistics and facts to support our arguments.

Mapping the existing Organic Waste systems in place at UTS was a highly effective research method for this task as it enabled us to identify influencing factors such as infrastructure and stakeholders. It also allowed us to visualise the acquisition and disposal processes used by students living in UTS housing in order for us to determine points of intervention.

mapping_1

 

In addition to this, surveying students allowed us to generate “real world observations” (Kelley et al. 2003) from a predetermined set of students. This was especially helpful as we were able to gain insights from our target users in order to adequately tailor our design solution to their needs. Furthermore, when completed correctly, surveying allows researchers to obtain data from a “representative sample” (Kelley et al. 2003) which can be generalised to a greater population in order to increase efficiency in workflow and expand the breadth from which information is obtained.

mapping_3

In summary, research is a crucial stage in any design process. Varying research methods also affect the type of data that is collected and how it can be used. This knowledge was highly useful to our group as we were able to identify research methods that would be most beneficial to our process, desired outcome and targeted users.

Reference List:

Unite for Sight 2015, Module 6: The Importance of Research, Connecticut, viewed 13 June 2017, <http://www.uniteforsight.org/research-methodology/module6>.

The University of Western Australia 2012, The importance of academic research, Perth, viewed 13 June 2017, <http://www.news.uwa.edu.au/201203194542/vice-chancellor/importance-academic-research>.

Cohen D, Crabtree B 2006, Qualitative Research Guidelines Project: Observation, New Jersey, viewed 13 June, <http://www.qualres.org/HomeObse-3594.html>.

Kelley, K., Clark, B., Brown, V. & Sitzia, J. 2003, ‘Good practice in the conduct and reporting of survey research’, International Journal for Quality in Health Care, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 261-6.

POST C : Researching Methods- Got to Start Somewhere

Our team, Green Tea Leaves conducted various means of research methods to determine the appropriateness’ and to develop a solution in line with our briefs goals.
Green Tea Leaves main objectives for the brief were to:
• Educate the people who use the undergrounds food court, about their wastes impact to the environment.
• Change the waste system within the underground so that the waste produced in the underground was divided correctly.
Surveying:Capture

Green Tealeaves, 2017, Waste Management in the Underground Survey, Survey Monkey, Taken Screenshot 7th June 2017.

We started with surveying people to justify that these objectives were necessary and that the lack of education was the cause of higher volumes of food wastage and incorrect waste disposal. 42% of people said that they don’t know how to divide their waste properly while 30 out of 50 people commented that if the bins were labelled better, that it would make dividing waste easier. This was a really imperative step for us as it highlighted our first design approach.

Ethnography:
Our team recorded and reviewed footage of people using the undergrounds waste system. This footage reaffirmed that a large portion of people didn’t understand the bin system because of their incorrect disposal of their waste. However it was not because of a lack of trying, multiple people took time to examine and process where they believed their rubbish should go, this confirmed to us that our stakeholders- being the users of the underground were a good target audience.

Literature Review:

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Organic Recycling, Closed Loop, viewed 4th June 2017, <http://www.closedloop.com.au/products-and-services/organic-recycling>.

The statistics and information we found from literary sources was the primary data we used for education and encouragement for people to divide their waste and change their habits. It was really important for us to have hard facts and statistics from a creditable and trustworthy sources for our audience to believe and resonate with.

Visual Analysis:

as

University of technology Sydney Marketing, 2017, UTS Brand Guidelines April 2017, University of Technology Sydney, viewed 3rd June 2017, <https://staff.uts.edu.au/topichub/MCU/Overview%20Page/UTS_Brand-Guidelines_2017.pdf >

Having the UTS board and marketing team as some of our main stakeholders, we believed that it was beneficial for our design aesthetics to fit cohesively within the new UTS branding. Therefore this meant that we relied on visual analysis of the current changes around the university while also assessing the UTS Branding Guidelines

to develop our designs aesthetics. Things taken into consideration were colour schemes, typography, composition and layout and iconography.

Mapping:
Combining what we had concluded from the literature reviews and visual analysis we were able to create our designs. It was then because of our mapping of the underground area that we could deduce where our designs could fit within the space the most effectively.

Overall these research methods were imperative to the success of our design in accordance to our brief. It was a lot easier to find solutions based from the data we found from each of these methods.

 

References:

Organic Recycling, Closed Loop, viewed 4th June 2017, <http://www.closedloop.com.au/products-and-services/organic-recycling>.

Green Tealeaves, 2017, Waste Management in the Underground Survey, Survey Monkey, Taken Screenshot 7th June 2017.

University of technology Sydney Marketing, 2017, UTS Brand Guidelines April 2017, University of Technology Sydney, viewed 3rd June 2017, <https://staff.uts.edu.au/topichub/MCU/Overview%20Page/UTS_Brand-Guidelines_2017.pdf > **Images were collaged together by Tegan Kearney

University of technology Sydney Marketing, 2017, UTS MCU Tone of Voice Guide, UTS, Sydney, viewed 3rd June 2017, <https://staff.uts.edu.au/topichub/MCU/Overview%20Page/UTS_Tone-of-Voice_2017.pdf >

 

 

Bin-go caddy liner

As a group we were tasked to help the NSW EPA design a bin liner made of newspaper that would be placed inside a small benchtop organics bin. To me the design I thought had to be extremely simple. Maybe pessimistic but I felt that even just a couple of folds is too much for many people to bother to attempt. I believe the solution lied not in constructing an origami construction but in the manor of how the paper is placed within the bin. However I was alone with these thoughts in my group so we continued with the origami solution. I do think the origami solution is more effective and still very easy but I didn’t feel very confident in being able to communicate that to the public and motivate them to try and use this solution.

As a group of different specialised designers I believe we were able to use what we knew as designers to envision a user based solution to the problem given. In the early stages of the project we designed our mission statement. Which was helpful to provide clarity and guidance for each decision (Bader & Jaeger 2014). Our main concerns for the project were; clarity, Simplicity, affordability and practicality.

Screen Shot 2017-05-11 at 4.37.13 pm

The brief of designing an origami paper bin liner was very direct in its objectives. In designing the liner we took great concern over the user experience. This meant not just considering what we think would be awesome or what the client wants but instead how the users will interact with our design (Gube 2010). So we needed a design simple and easy enough that people would actually be motivated enough to make it. Also we had to be able to communicate how simple this design was. We considered whole experience, from making the liner, to placing waste in the liner, to removing and discarding the liner. We made changes to the liner so that it would be strong enough to hold as much waste as what could fit in the caddy. This was a balance as if it was too complicated people would not make it in the first place but if it was not strong enough it would break on people and then they would not make it again.

Bin-go

By Understanding the user experience through observation and interviewing and reworking the findings into our design we would be able to impel the user to correctly dispose of organic waste. As our target users are almost everyone in NSW this meant interpreting the different reasons why different demographics don’t dispose of organic waste properly. Conducting practices of design thinking as described by Tim Brown from Harvard Business Review became a big part of this project (Brown, 2008).

Our final design fulfilled the brief outlines and was an effective design, however I do question how prevalent newspapers are these days and how this trend will continue. With more time for this project I would have liked to explored this question more thoroughly and if appropriate considered alternatives to a newspaper based liner.

 

Reference List

Bader C. & Jaeger M. 2004, What Makes an Interdisciplinary Team Work? A Collection of Informed Ideas, Discussion Prompts, and Other Materials to Promote an Atmosphere of Collaboration, Trust, and Respect, Pacific University, viewed 12th June 2017, <http://commons.pacificu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1051&context=ipp&gt >

Brown, T. 2008, Design Thinking, Hardvard Business Review, viewed 12th June 2017, <https://hbr.org/2008/06/design-thinking&gt >

Gube, J. 2010, What is User Experience Design? Overview, Tools and Resources, Smashing Magazine, viewed 12th June 2017, <https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/what-is-user-experience-design-overview-tools-and-resources/ >